Apple Announced Its Picks for Best Apps of 2019
Technology

Apple Announced Its Picks for Best Apps of 2019

Apple Announced Its Picks for Best Apps of 2019

Apple released its picks for the best apps and games of 2019 at an event in New York City on Monday.

It also identified what it deemed were the most important trends that drove app development in the past year — namely reimagined franchises (like Pokémon Masters and Minecraft Earth) and apps that allow for easy content creation (like Anchor and Wattpad).

“We are excited to announce such a diverse group of 2019 App Store winners, showing that great design and creativity comes from developers large and small, and from every corner of the world,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. Here are Apple’s picks for best apps and games of 2019 — at least on Apple devices.

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Apple

Mac App of the Year

Affinity Publisher by Serif Labs

Making books, magazines or other layout-heavy projects requires serious publishing software, but often comes at a high cost. Affinity Publisher’s affordable price and integration with other Serif Labs apps (like Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer) means you can take advantage of multiple features without ruining your workflow, switching apps or breaking the bank.

Among the lesser studied effects of climate change are the social and economic impacts on women.
                    
                    Nitya Rao, professor of gender and development at University of East Anglia has been studying gender and development for decades; with the recent attention on the profound impact that global temperature changes are having on local and national economies, she decided to analyze the impact of climate change on women specifically. She and her team studied data collected from 25 case studies in 11 hot spot countries in Asia and Africa to document how climate change is influencing women’s status—measured by their ability to make strategic decisions about their livelihoods, take agency over their financial situations, and work to improve their social and economic positions, among other things.
                    
                    “What we found is that climate change and environmental stress are common factors that intensify pre-existing disadvantages or gender and developmental inequalities,” she says. That’s especially true in poorer parts of the world, where families depend on agriculture and labor jobs to make money, and where male migration, male-dominated labor markets, and patriarchal institutions already put stresses on families, mostly women, that are struggling to survive. Climate change exacerbates those burdens, Rao found.
                    
                    For example, as warming global temperatures lead to more crop uncertainty—droughts or floods could wipe out a year’s work in a matter of weeks -- breadwinners, often male, are more likely to have to move away from the family for months at a time to earn an income. Women are left to care for the children and earn whatever they can, because often the men aren’t able to send their wages home on a regular basis. Even if they can, says Rao, the hard labor in industries which are unfamiliar to them, such as construction or mining, often compromises their health, and many families have to spend an increasing amount on medical costs. “Even if they are bringing money, not all of that is going to the household necessarily,” says Rao.
                    
                    Labor markets around the world also typically discriminate against women, forcing them to find low-paying jobs, or dangerous, often illegal ones like selling drugs or prostitution. As the climate becomes more unpredictable with changing temperatures, pressures on women in agriculture-based economies deepens.
                    
                    State regulations governing banking and land ownership also work against them. Only 15% of land around the world is owned by women, for example, and climate hot spots are no different. Since male family members hold the title for land ownership, banks often deny women women seeking loans that would use their land or future crops as collateral. When they can’t seek loans from legitimate institutions, these women are forced to turn to private lenders who charge higher interest rates and can be corrupt, further putting women at financial risk.
                    
                    “These disadvantages already exist for women, but with the unpredictable climate, women sometimes have to make pre-emptive decisions about whether their crop will survive, or if their livestock will survive the season, and sometimes they are forced to make risky decisions,” says Rao. “So, the uncertainty that comes with climate change is particularly hard on women.”
                    
                    In many poorer countries, services like childcare, potable water, and affordable food programs are privatized and expensive, putting them out of reach of the families that need them most. Making such services more widely available could significantly alleviate the climate-related burdens on women.
                    
                    In their analysis, Rao and her team did find some programs starting to address these cultural and institutional burdens on women. In parts of northern India, for example, there are grass-roots efforts to get male family members who find jobs away from home to leave their bank cards to their wives, allowing them to access cash to hire workers when they need funds. “What I see happening on the ground, at the household level, makes me optimistic,” says Rao. “I was even surprised to find that norms in rigid paternalistic societies are turning quite supportive of empowering women more. But unfortunately, in order to implement most climate-based adaptations on a community level, you end up talking to the elite men who are the village leaders, and they ignore the pressures of climate and the need to support women.”
                    
                    As more and more younger men and women voice their support for changing cultural and financial norms that disadvantage women, that could change though, Rao says. In the course of gathering data for the study, she notes, most of the people who participated were grateful for the opportunity to provide their perspective and to be heard. “They said nobody bothers to talk to them,” says Rao. “These are views that are missing in research and in producing real change.”

Among the lesser studied effects of climate change are the social and economic impacts on women.

Nitya Rao, professor of gender and development at University of East Anglia has been studying gender and development for decades; with the recent attention on the profound impact that global temperature changes are having on local and national economies, she decided to analyze the impact of climate change on women specifically. She and her team studied data collected from 25 case studies in 11 hot spot countries in Asia and Africa to document how climate change is influencing women’s status—measured by their ability to make strategic decisions about their livelihoods, take agency over their financial situations, and work to improve their social and economic positions, among other things.

“What we found is that climate change and environmental stress are common factors that intensify pre-existing disadvantages or gender and developmental inequalities,” she says. That’s especially true in poorer parts of the world, where families depend on agriculture and labor jobs to make money, and where male migration, male-dominated labor markets, and patriarchal institutions already put stresses on families, mostly women, that are struggling to survive. Climate change exacerbates those burdens, Rao found.

For example, as warming global temperatures lead to more crop uncertainty—droughts or floods could wipe out a year’s work in a matter of weeks — breadwinners, often male, are more likely to have to move away from the family for months at a time to earn an income. Women are left to care for the children and earn whatever they can, because often the men aren’t able to send their wages home on a regular basis. Even if they can, says Rao, the hard labor in industries which are unfamiliar to them, such as construction or mining, often compromises their health, and many families have to spend an increasing amount on medical costs. “Even if they are bringing money, not all of that is going to the household necessarily,” says Rao.

Labor markets around the world also typically discriminate against women, forcing them to find low-paying jobs, or dangerous, often illegal ones like selling drugs or prostitution. As the climate becomes more unpredictable with changing temperatures, pressures on women in agriculture-based economies deepens.

State regulations governing banking and land ownership also work against them. Only 15% of land around the world is owned by women, for example, and climate hot spots are no different. Since male family members hold the title for land ownership, banks often deny women women seeking loans that would use their land or future crops as collateral. When they can’t seek loans from legitimate institutions, these women are forced to turn to private lenders who charge higher interest rates and can be corrupt, further putting women at financial risk.

“These disadvantages already exist for women, but with the unpredictable climate, women sometimes have to make pre-emptive decisions about whether their crop will survive, or if their livestock will survive the season, and sometimes they are forced to make risky decisions,” says Rao. “So, the uncertainty that comes with climate change is particularly hard on women.”

In many poorer countries, services like childcare, potable water, and affordable food programs are privatized and expensive, putting them out of reach of the families that need them most. Making such services more widely available could significantly alleviate the climate-related burdens on women.

In their analysis, Rao and her team did find some programs starting to address these cultural and institutional burdens on women. In parts of northern India, for example, there are grass-roots efforts to get male family members who find jobs away from home to leave their bank cards to their wives, allowing them to access cash to hire workers when they need funds. “What I see happening on the ground, at the household level, makes me optimistic,” says Rao. “I was even surprised to find that norms in rigid paternalistic societies are turning quite supportive of empowering women more. But unfortunately, in order to implement most climate-based adaptations on a community level, you end up talking to the elite men who are the village leaders, and they ignore the pressures of climate and the need to support women.”

As more and more younger men and women voice their support for changing cultural and financial norms that disadvantage women, that could change though, Rao says. In the course of gathering data for the study, she notes, most of the people who participated were grateful for the opportunity to provide their perspective and to be heard. “They said nobody bothers to talk to them,” says Rao. “These are views that are missing in research and in producing real change.”

Apple

Mac Game of the Year

Gris by Devolver & Nomada Studio

Gris is a visually arresting platformer-puzzle game about a woman exploring the world after losing her voice. It’s short — you can finish the game in a few hours — but once you’re done, you’ll be glad you experienced developer Nomada Studio’s artistic endeavor, one that will tug at your heartstrings and amaze you with its wordless storytelling.

Tis the season when a blizzard of holiday and wintery-themed songs hits the radio waves. And yet, in recent years, one classic in particular has become controversial over the last decade.
                    
                    A year after radio stations banned  Baby, It's Cold Outside  because of it's been seen, in the #MeToo era, as being about a man pressuring a woman not to go home and stay with him, John Legend and Kelly Clarkson released a modern version. When the female singer sings  I really can't stay / I've got to away (But baby, it's cold outside) [x2] Legend sings,  But, I can call you a ride)My momma will start to worry (I'll call the car and tell him to hurry). The line  I ought to say  No, no, no sir  (Mind if I move in closer?)  is replaced with  I ought to say,  No, no, no, sir  (Then you really ought to go, go, go).  Instead of  Say what's in this drink (No cabs to be had out there) , Clarkson sings  What will my friends think? If I have one more drink?  and Legend says,  (It's your body and your choice). 
                    
                    https://twitter.com/johnlegend/status/1192849579349356549
                    
                    The song took off when Ricardo Montalban and Esther Williams performed it in the 1949 movie Neptune's Daughter. The two actors sitting on the couch, and when Williams sings  I really can't stay  tries to stand up, Montalban tugs at her arm and sits her back down on the couch.
                    
                     Gene Lester—Getty Images Frank Loesser, composer and lyricist who wrote  Baby, It's Cold Outside.  
                    
                     Baby, It's Cold Outside  became a  bouncy new jukebox favorite,  and even back then people thought it was risqué. As TIME reported in the June 27, 1949, issue:  It was all about a girl who kept protesting that she had to go home and a boy who kept insisting that she stay. Queasy NBC first banned the lyrics as too racy, then decided they contained nothing provably prurient, and put the tune on the air. Baby hit the hit parade and began climbing.  (TIME described the songwriter Frank Loesser created what today would be considered viral gold in 1947 with  Bloop Bleep,  an onomatopoeic song in which he impersonates a leaky faucet.)
                    
                     Baby, It's Cold Outside  won the Academy Award for best song in 1950, and it became one of the hottest songs of the holiday season in the next years. Artists who covered the song include Louis Armstrong, Sammy Davis, Jr., Ray Charles, Dean Martin, Ella Fitzgerald, Bette Midler and James Caan, Dolly Parton and Rod Stewart, and even Miss Piggy sings it on The Muppet Show. TIME named it one of the 100 most popular songs of all time.
                    
                    It's not that women didn't have pre-marital sex, but if they got caught, there would be serious consequences if they didn't  hold out,  as they said in the 1940s.
                    
                     It was a weird contradictory time, just a lot of hypocrisy,  says Rachel Devlin, author of Relative Intimacy: Fathers, Adolescent Daughters, and Postwar American Culture and a professor of History at Rutgers University.  Men were expected to push, and women were expected to make sure men didn't cross the line, which was entirely up to the women because if line was crossed, and they did have sex, she was ruined. The song is an important historical document because it does represent these constant negotiations. It's describing an everyday encounter. 
                    
                    If people found out a woman had had pre-marital sex — and got pregnant — her personal reputation and her family's reputation would be on the line. These women were considered damaged goods, unfit for marriage. Women who got pregnant were kicked out of their homes and out of college; pregnant high schoolers were sent to homes for unwed mothers, forced to give their babies up for adoption, and undergo a rehabilitation program before they could go back to school, according to Devlin.
                    
                    Or these women could be arrested and imprisoned. Scott W. Stern's book The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison “Promiscuous” Women is about the  American Plan,  in which the federal government rounded up tens of thousands women suspected of being promiscuous in concentration camps for national security purposes to safeguard the troops from sexually-transmitted diseases during the first half of the 20th century, and especially during World War II. At a time when women were starting to pursue higher education, mass imprisonment was a way to control them — a situation TIME likened to book-turned-hit-TV-show The Handmaid's Tale. But most of the women targeted were minorities and working class. These female prisoners did not remain silent; they resisted.
                    
                    Many women did get married at younger ages and dropped out of college to do so or got married to the first person they had sex.
                    
                    There was some permissiveness during World War II.  People behaved in war in ways they wouldn't behave in peace time,  says Beth Bailey, author of From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in 20th Century America and the Director of the Center for Military, War, and Society Studies at the University of Kansas Couples had sex because  they thought they might never see each other again.  Post-war, there was such a big emphasis on getting veterans married, so women got married at younger ages, and even dropped out of college to do so. Many got the first person they had sex with because it was considered the right thing to do.
                    
                    Experts on mid-20th century sexual norms say society's expectations for female behavior on a date can be seen in the parts of the song in which the woman sings  I ought to say  No, no, no sir / At least I'm going to say that I tried  and rattles off all the members of her family and extended family who will  worry  or be  suspicious  and the neighbors who would  talk. 
                    
                     That song comes from an era when women were just expected to say no, no matter what they wanted,  says Bailey.  The culture refused to acknowledge women's right to say yes or no, not being able to say yes is as much as a problem as having to say no. 
                    
                    Whether the woman in the song is seen as wanting to stay depends on the time in history in which you are listening to it. When the song came out, Bailey argues,  It portrayed a woman who wanted to stay, but was faced with public insistence that she couldn't do that or she would face public censure. The way we hear it today, no means no, and he ought to back off. 
                    
                    Social science research also showed the contradictory views on women's sexual behavior. According to Alfred Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (aka the  Kinsey Report ), about one of the best-selling books in America in 1948, about half of men said they wanted to marry a virgin, and more than 60 percent of college-educated men said they disapproved of premarital sex, and about 80 percent of college-educated women said they had moral objections to it, and yet, about half of women and more than half of men said they had had pre-marital sex.  Not since Gone With the Wind had booksellers seen anything like it,  TIME reported back then on the book's popularity, which noted that even Wellesley College students could not purchase the book at the college bookstore without a permission letter from a professor (so they didn't).
                    
                    There were laws on the age of consent, which protected children, but the idea of consent in terms of protecting women from rape or harassment and sexual misconduct on a date wasn't in public consciousness or in the law when  Baby, It's Cold Outside  came out in the mid-1940sTHIS SECTION MAY UPDATE AFTER TALKING TO HECK ESTELLE FREEDMAN.  The notion that women were sexual decision-makers in their own right was not a popular one,  says Joe Fischel, a professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Yale University and author of Screw Consent: A Better Politics of Sexual Justice.
                    
                     If woman is already alone with the man and potentially flirting, that could be considered consent [back then],  says Devlin.  If a women tried to bring this into court, the court would say, 'What were you doing alone with him?' They would blame her. There was no way for women to win. The redefinition of consent during the second wave of feminism includes people that you might have said 'I have to go' to.  Most marital rape laws started to appear after the 1970s, meaning until then, husbands could not be charged with rape, and  date rape  becomes a better known concept in the 1980s.
                    
                    Scholars told TIME that the song is clearly about white people because white men took advantage of women of color without hesitation, and they ex.  Interracial rape was a ubiquitous form of terrorism in the South,  says Devlin.  Sexual harassment of black women was even worse than sexual harassment of white women. On the streets of southern cities in rural ares, white men felt entitled to black women's bodies.'
                    
                    In fact, the year  Baby, It's Cold Outside  was written in 1944, the NAACP sent Rosa Parks to help a 24-year-old Alabama sharecropper, wife, mother Recy Taylor speak out about being gang-raped by six white men on her way home from church. While two grand juries didn't indict the men, the case and protests against the rape of black women helped lay the groundwork for the civil rights movement that became even more famous after Parks' Montgomery Bus Boycott a decade later. Rumors about an African-American man raping a white woman sparked about half of race riots between Reconstruction and World War II, according to historian Danielle McGuire.
                    
                    The magazine's 1949 article on the song's popularity noted that the song, written in 1944 by Frank Loesser (Guys and Dolls) was originally a schtick that the songwriter performed with his wife at parties. But to people who don't know that the song was inspired by a married couple, the song comes off as being about singles. 
                    
                    The public attention hasn't hurt sales of the song, however. In fact, it helped it. Last year, by mid-December, Dean Martin's 1959 cover became the second best-selling song by mid-December.
                    
                    And the new version that was supposed to take out the controversial elements has also become controversial among people who think the song is harmless fun. On The Talk, Sharon Osbourne said it's  ridiculous  and  not right  to change  an innocent lyric  and record a new version, which she said is akin to trying to covering up nudes in classic works of art. In response, Clarkson said they just wanted to give people thought the original was uncomfortable  another option.  Legend pointed out that people remake songs all the time and that,  If you don’t wanna listen to it, you don’t have to.

Tis the season when a blizzard of holiday and wintery-themed songs hits the radio waves. And yet, in recent years, one classic in particular has become controversial over the last decade.

A year after radio stations banned “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” because of it’s been seen, in the #MeToo era, as being about a man pressuring a woman not to go home and stay with him, John Legend and Kelly Clarkson released a modern version. When the female singer sings “I really can’t stay / I’ve got to away (But baby, it’s cold outside) [x2] Legend sings, “But, I can call you a ride)My momma will start to worry (I’ll call the car and tell him to hurry). The line “I ought to say “No, no, no sir” (Mind if I move in closer?)” is replaced with “I ought to say, “No, no, no, sir” (Then you really ought to go, go, go).” Instead of “Say what’s in this drink (No cabs to be had out there)”, Clarkson sings “What will my friends think? If I have one more drink?” and Legend says, “(It’s your body and your choice).”

The song took off when Ricardo Montalban and Esther Williams performed it in the 1949 movie Neptune’s Daughter. The two actors sitting on the couch, and when Williams sings “I really can’t stay” tries to stand up, Montalban tugs at her arm and sits her back down on the couch.

Gene Lester—Getty Images Frank Loesser, composer and lyricist who wrote “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.”

“Baby, It’s Cold Outside” became a “bouncy new jukebox favorite,” and even back then people thought it was risqué. As TIME reported in the June 27, 1949, issue: “It was all about a girl who kept protesting that she had to go home and a boy who kept insisting that she stay. Queasy NBC first banned the lyrics as too racy, then decided they contained nothing provably prurient, and put the tune on the air. Baby hit the hit parade and began climbing.” (TIME described the songwriter Frank Loesser created what today would be considered viral gold in 1947 with “Bloop Bleep,” an onomatopoeic song in which he impersonates a leaky faucet.)

“Baby, It’s Cold Outside” won the Academy Award for best song in 1950, and it became one of the hottest songs of the holiday season in the next years. Artists who covered the song include Louis Armstrong, Sammy Davis, Jr., Ray Charles, Dean Martin, Ella Fitzgerald, Bette Midler and James Caan, Dolly Parton and Rod Stewart, and even Miss Piggy sings it on The Muppet Show. TIME named it one of the 100 most popular songs of all time.

It’s not that women didn’t have pre-marital sex, but if they got caught, there would be serious consequences if they didn’t “hold out,” as they said in the 1940s.

“It was a weird contradictory time, just a lot of hypocrisy,” says Rachel Devlin, author of Relative Intimacy: Fathers, Adolescent Daughters, and Postwar American Culture and a professor of History at Rutgers University. “Men were expected to push, and women were expected to make sure men didn’t cross the line, which was entirely up to the women because if line was crossed, and they did have sex, she was ruined. The song is an important historical document because it does represent these constant negotiations. It’s describing an everyday encounter.”

If people found out a woman had had pre-marital sex — and got pregnant — her personal reputation and her family’s reputation would be on the line. These women were considered damaged goods, unfit for marriage. Women who got pregnant were kicked out of their homes and out of college; pregnant high schoolers were sent to homes for unwed mothers, forced to give their babies up for adoption, and undergo a rehabilitation program before they could go back to school, according to Devlin.

Or these women could be arrested and imprisoned. Scott W. Stern’s book The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison “Promiscuous” Women is about the “American Plan,” in which the federal government rounded up tens of thousands women suspected of being promiscuous in concentration camps for national security purposes to safeguard the troops from sexually-transmitted diseases during the first half of the 20th century, and especially during World War II. At a time when women were starting to pursue higher education, mass imprisonment was a way to control them — a situation TIME likened to book-turned-hit-TV-show The Handmaid’s Tale. But most of the women targeted were minorities and working class. These female prisoners did not remain silent; they resisted.

Many women did get married at younger ages and dropped out of college to do so or got married to the first person they had sex.

There was some permissiveness during World War II. “People behaved in war in ways they wouldn’t behave in peace time,” says Beth Bailey, author of From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in 20th Century America and the Director of the Center for Military, War, and Society Studies at the University of Kansas Couples had sex because “they thought they might never see each other again.” Post-war, there was such a big emphasis on getting veterans married, so women got married at younger ages, and even dropped out of college to do so. Many got the first person they had sex with because it was considered the right thing to do.

Experts on mid-20th century sexual norms say society’s expectations for female behavior on a date can be seen in the parts of the song in which the woman sings “I ought to say “No, no, no sir / At least I’m going to say that I tried” and rattles off all the members of her family and extended family who will “worry” or be “suspicious” and the neighbors who would “talk.”

“That song comes from an era when women were just expected to say no, no matter what they wanted,” says Bailey. “The culture refused to acknowledge women’s right to say yes or no, not being able to say yes is as much as a problem as having to say no.”

Whether the woman in the song is seen as wanting to stay depends on the time in history in which you are listening to it. When the song came out, Bailey argues, “It portrayed a woman who wanted to stay, but was faced with public insistence that she couldn’t do that or she would face public censure. The way we hear it today, no means no, and he ought to back off.”

Social science research also showed the contradictory views on women’s sexual behavior. According to Alfred Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (aka the “Kinsey Report”), about one of the best-selling books in America in 1948, about half of men said they wanted to marry a virgin, and more than 60 percent of college-educated men said they disapproved of premarital sex, and about 80 percent of college-educated women said they had moral objections to it, and yet, about half of women and more than half of men said they had had pre-marital sex. “Not since Gone With the Wind had booksellers seen anything like it,” TIME reported back then on the book’s popularity, which noted that even Wellesley College students could not purchase the book at the college bookstore without a permission letter from a professor (so they didn’t).

There were laws on the age of consent, which protected children, but the idea of consent in terms of protecting women from rape or harassment and sexual misconduct on a date wasn’t in public consciousness or in the law when “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” came out in the mid-1940sTHIS SECTION MAY UPDATE AFTER TALKING TO HECK ESTELLE FREEDMAN. “The notion that women were sexual decision-makers in their own right was not a popular one,” says Joe Fischel, a professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Yale University and author of Screw Consent: A Better Politics of Sexual Justice.

“If woman is already alone with the man and potentially flirting, that could be considered consent [back then],” says Devlin. “If a women tried to bring this into court, the court would say, ‘What were you doing alone with him?’ They would blame her. There was no way for women to win. The redefinition of consent during the second wave of feminism includes people that you might have said ‘I have to go’ to.” Most marital rape laws started to appear after the 1970s, meaning until then, husbands could not be charged with rape, and “date rape” becomes a better known concept in the 1980s.

Scholars told TIME that the song is clearly about white people because white men took advantage of women of color without hesitation, and they ex. “Interracial rape was a ubiquitous form of terrorism in the South,” says Devlin. “Sexual harassment of black women was even worse than sexual harassment of white women. On the streets of southern cities in rural ares, white men felt entitled to black women’s bodies.’

In fact, the year “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” was written in 1944, the NAACP sent Rosa Parks to help a 24-year-old Alabama sharecropper, wife, mother Recy Taylor speak out about being gang-raped by six white men on her way home from church. While two grand juries didn’t indict the men, the case and protests against the rape of black women helped lay the groundwork for the civil rights movement that became even more famous after Parks’ Montgomery Bus Boycott a decade later. Rumors about an African-American man raping a white woman sparked about half of race riots between Reconstruction and World War II, according to historian Danielle McGuire.

The magazine’s 1949 article on the song’s popularity noted that the song, written in 1944 by Frank Loesser (Guys and Dolls) was originally a schtick that the songwriter performed with his wife at parties. But to people who don’t know that the song was inspired by a married couple, the song comes off as being about singles.

The public attention hasn’t hurt sales of the song, however. In fact, it helped it. Last year, by mid-December, Dean Martin’s 1959 cover became the second best-selling song by mid-December.

And the new version that was supposed to take out the controversial elements has also become controversial among people who think the song is harmless fun. On The Talk, Sharon Osbourne said it’s “ridiculous” and “not right” to change “an innocent lyric” and record a new version, which she said is akin to trying to covering up nudes in classic works of art. In response, Clarkson said they just wanted to give people thought the original was uncomfortable “another option.” Legend pointed out that people remake songs all the time and that, “If you don’t wanna listen to it, you don’t have to.”

Apple

iPad App of the Year

Flow by Moleskine

Moleskine’s Flow is a drawing and sketching app, one that attempts to simplify the drawing experience by doing away with the traditional “sketchbook” idea found in other drawing apps. Instead, Flow’s sketchbook is a timeline, letting you swipe for more space or scrub through your drawing history like you would a YouTube video. Combined with a new approach to creating brushes and editing layers, Flow is a great addition to your catalog of artistic apps.

Among the lesser studied effects of climate change are the social and economic impacts on women.
                    
                    Nitya Rao, professor of gender and development at University of East Anglia has been studying gender and development for decades; with the recent attention on the profound impact that global temperature changes are having on local and national economies, she decided to analyze the impact of climate change on women specifically. She and her team studied data collected from 25 case studies in 11 hot spot countries in Asia and Africa to document how climate change is influencing women’s status—measured by their ability to make strategic decisions about their livelihoods, take agency over their financial situations, and work to improve their social and economic positions, among other things.
                    
                    “What we found is that climate change and environmental stress are common factors that intensify pre-existing disadvantages or gender and developmental inequalities,” she says. That’s especially true in poorer parts of the world, where families depend on agriculture and labor jobs to make money, and where male migration, male-dominated labor markets, and patriarchal institutions already put stresses on families, mostly women, that are struggling to survive. Climate change exacerbates those burdens, Rao found.
                    
                    For example, as warming global temperatures lead to more crop uncertainty—droughts or floods could wipe out a year’s work in a matter of weeks -- breadwinners, often male, are more likely to have to move away from the family for months at a time to earn an income. Women are left to care for the children and earn whatever they can, because often the men aren’t able to send their wages home on a regular basis. Even if they can, says Rao, the hard labor in industries which are unfamiliar to them, such as construction or mining, often compromises their health, and many families have to spend an increasing amount on medical costs. “Even if they are bringing money, not all of that is going to the household necessarily,” says Rao.
                    
                    Labor markets around the world also typically discriminate against women, forcing them to find low-paying jobs, or dangerous, often illegal ones like selling drugs or prostitution. As the climate becomes more unpredictable with changing temperatures, pressures on women in agriculture-based economies deepens.
                    
                    State regulations governing banking and land ownership also work against them. Only 15% of land around the world is owned by women, for example, and climate hot spots are no different. Since male family members hold the title for land ownership, banks often deny women women seeking loans that would use their land or future crops as collateral. When they can’t seek loans from legitimate institutions, these women are forced to turn to private lenders who charge higher interest rates and can be corrupt, further putting women at financial risk.
                    
                    “These disadvantages already exist for women, but with the unpredictable climate, women sometimes have to make pre-emptive decisions about whether their crop will survive, or if their livestock will survive the season, and sometimes they are forced to make risky decisions,” says Rao. “So, the uncertainty that comes with climate change is particularly hard on women.”
                    
                    In many poorer countries, services like childcare, potable water, and affordable food programs are privatized and expensive, putting them out of reach of the families that need them most. Making such services more widely available could significantly alleviate the climate-related burdens on women.
                    
                    In their analysis, Rao and her team did find some programs starting to address these cultural and institutional burdens on women. In parts of northern India, for example, there are grass-roots efforts to get male family members who find jobs away from home to leave their bank cards to their wives, allowing them to access cash to hire workers when they need funds. “What I see happening on the ground, at the household level, makes me optimistic,” says Rao. “I was even surprised to find that norms in rigid paternalistic societies are turning quite supportive of empowering women more. But unfortunately, in order to implement most climate-based adaptations on a community level, you end up talking to the elite men who are the village leaders, and they ignore the pressures of climate and the need to support women.”
                    
                    As more and more younger men and women voice their support for changing cultural and financial norms that disadvantage women, that could change though, Rao says. In the course of gathering data for the study, she notes, most of the people who participated were grateful for the opportunity to provide their perspective and to be heard. “They said nobody bothers to talk to them,” says Rao. “These are views that are missing in research and in producing real change.”

Among the lesser studied effects of climate change are the social and economic impacts on women.

Nitya Rao, professor of gender and development at University of East Anglia has been studying gender and development for decades; with the recent attention on the profound impact that global temperature changes are having on local and national economies, she decided to analyze the impact of climate change on women specifically. She and her team studied data collected from 25 case studies in 11 hot spot countries in Asia and Africa to document how climate change is influencing women’s status—measured by their ability to make strategic decisions about their livelihoods, take agency over their financial situations, and work to improve their social and economic positions, among other things.

“What we found is that climate change and environmental stress are common factors that intensify pre-existing disadvantages or gender and developmental inequalities,” she says. That’s especially true in poorer parts of the world, where families depend on agriculture and labor jobs to make money, and where male migration, male-dominated labor markets, and patriarchal institutions already put stresses on families, mostly women, that are struggling to survive. Climate change exacerbates those burdens, Rao found.

For example, as warming global temperatures lead to more crop uncertainty—droughts or floods could wipe out a year’s work in a matter of weeks — breadwinners, often male, are more likely to have to move away from the family for months at a time to earn an income. Women are left to care for the children and earn whatever they can, because often the men aren’t able to send their wages home on a regular basis. Even if they can, says Rao, the hard labor in industries which are unfamiliar to them, such as construction or mining, often compromises their health, and many families have to spend an increasing amount on medical costs. “Even if they are bringing money, not all of that is going to the household necessarily,” says Rao.

Labor markets around the world also typically discriminate against women, forcing them to find low-paying jobs, or dangerous, often illegal ones like selling drugs or prostitution. As the climate becomes more unpredictable with changing temperatures, pressures on women in agriculture-based economies deepens.

State regulations governing banking and land ownership also work against them. Only 15% of land around the world is owned by women, for example, and climate hot spots are no different. Since male family members hold the title for land ownership, banks often deny women women seeking loans that would use their land or future crops as collateral. When they can’t seek loans from legitimate institutions, these women are forced to turn to private lenders who charge higher interest rates and can be corrupt, further putting women at financial risk.

“These disadvantages already exist for women, but with the unpredictable climate, women sometimes have to make pre-emptive decisions about whether their crop will survive, or if their livestock will survive the season, and sometimes they are forced to make risky decisions,” says Rao. “So, the uncertainty that comes with climate change is particularly hard on women.”

In many poorer countries, services like childcare, potable water, and affordable food programs are privatized and expensive, putting them out of reach of the families that need them most. Making such services more widely available could significantly alleviate the climate-related burdens on women.

In their analysis, Rao and her team did find some programs starting to address these cultural and institutional burdens on women. In parts of northern India, for example, there are grass-roots efforts to get male family members who find jobs away from home to leave their bank cards to their wives, allowing them to access cash to hire workers when they need funds. “What I see happening on the ground, at the household level, makes me optimistic,” says Rao. “I was even surprised to find that norms in rigid paternalistic societies are turning quite supportive of empowering women more. But unfortunately, in order to implement most climate-based adaptations on a community level, you end up talking to the elite men who are the village leaders, and they ignore the pressures of climate and the need to support women.”

As more and more younger men and women voice their support for changing cultural and financial norms that disadvantage women, that could change though, Rao says. In the course of gathering data for the study, she notes, most of the people who participated were grateful for the opportunity to provide their perspective and to be heard. “They said nobody bothers to talk to them,” says Rao. “These are views that are missing in research and in producing real change.”

Apple

iPad Game of the Year

Hyper Light Drifter by Abylight & Heart Machine

Though originally released in 2016, lauded indie game Hyper Light Drifter came to the iPad this past summer. With beautifully-done retro visuals, fast-paced action sequences and notoriously difficult gameplay, the game provides a rewarding experience for those willing to stick it out and endure more than a few losses on their quest to understand what happened to their now-apocalyptic world.

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Apple

Apple TV Game of the Year

Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap by DotEmu

Once an ’80s classic, the reboot of the platformer-adventure game Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap features gorgeous hand-drawn animations and beautiful 2D environments to explore. If you’re feeling nostalgic, you can even switch between a more 8-bit style reminiscent of the original and its more modern look.

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                    Yes, keep me on the list!

Caroline’s text here
Yes, keep me on the list!
Apple

Apple TV App of the Year

The Explorers by The Explorers Network

The Explorers is an exploration-based social network, where people share images and video of the natural world’s splendor for you to view on your iOS device or Apple TV. The Explorers supports recordings up to 8K, lets you explore by location, and makes it easy to create lists of favorite images and videos.

Apple

iPhone Game of the Year

Sky: Children of the Light by thatgamecompany

Puzzle game Sky: Children of the Light channels developer thatgamecompany’s artistic expertise, that it flexed in games like Flower and Journey, to create a beautiful and vibrant world shared by you and other players in this always-online game. Prepare to go on a quest to send fallen spirits back to heaven while collaborating with friends to solve puzzles and collect prizes.

Apple

iPhone App of the Year

Spectre Camera by Lux Optics

Spectre Camera makes long-exposure photos easier, even without a tripod, thanks to some handy AI software. Its scene detection can automatically adjust to capture light trails at night, and computer vision software helps with image stabilization, so your jittery hand doesn’t ruin your photos.

(FORT WORT, Texas) — An English teacher who was fired after tweeting that her Texas high school was full of students who are in the country illegally has won an appeal to get her job back.
                    
                    The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath ruled Monday that Carter-Riverside High School teacher Georgia Clark’s tweet was protected by the First Amendment. Clark can either receive back pay and employment benefits or the Fort Worth Independent School District can pay her a year’s salary.
                    
                    District spokeswoman Barbara Griffith says Morath’s ruling was a technicality and the district is exploring its options.
                    
                    Clark’s attorney didn’t respond for a comment.
                    
                    The district board voted in June to fire Clark. She told a district investigator that her tweet was meant only for President Donald Trump and that she didn’t realize her postings were public.

(FORT WORT, Texas) — An English teacher who was fired after tweeting that her Texas high school was full of students who are in the country illegally has won an appeal to get her job back.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath ruled Monday that Carter-Riverside High School teacher Georgia Clark’s tweet was protected by the First Amendment. Clark can either receive back pay and employment benefits or the Fort Worth Independent School District can pay her a year’s salary.

District spokeswoman Barbara Griffith says Morath’s ruling was a technicality and the district is exploring its options.

Clark’s attorney didn’t respond for a comment.

The district board voted in June to fire Clark. She told a district investigator that her tweet was meant only for President Donald Trump and that she didn’t realize her postings were public.

Apple

Apple Arcade Game of the Year

Sayonara Wild Hearts by Annapurna Interactive & Simogo

Available on Apple Arcade, Sayonara Wild Hearts is a music-fueled adventure game with speeding motorcycles, clashing blades and cool outfits. Its on-rails gameplay is dead simple — collect hearts, time button presses and avoid obstacles — but always exciting, and looks fantastic.

Write to Patrick Lucas Austin at patrick.austin@time.com.

Published at Tue, 03 Dec 2019 19:54:19 +0000